Ending a sentence with ellipses

Ending a sentence with ellipses

Ellipses are a good way to show hesitation or a pause in speech. They’re often used in dialogue to indicate that a character is trailing off, or has stopped talking.

The ellipsis can also be used to show that something has been left out of a quotation. If you want to quote someone who said something without using all of it, you could use an ellipsis at the point where you stop quoting them:

Sentences

  1. …as long as she could remember, she had wanted to get married here on this island.
  2. Tommy asked if he could have some more ice cream…but his father refused.
  3. She was very sorry to hear about the accident, “but …”
  4. I can’t believe you would do that! Ellipses…”
  5. “You are a liar and a fraud. “
  6. “No, I will not be quiet.”
  7. I have been thinking about this for a long time…
  8. It’s all about making good choices…
  9. He didn’t know what to do…
  10. I was born in London, England … moved to America when I was eight.
  11. My favorite movie of all time is … The Godfather.
  12. I love my parents and siblings … but I don’t really talk to them anymore.
  13. “I am, I’m sure, not alone in feeling that something is missing from our lives.”
  14. “Well, I’d have to say that ignorance is bliss for me.”
  15. “We’ll have to wait and see how things turn out.”
  16. “I’m looking forward to seeing what happens next.”
  17. I was going to say something, but I lost my train of thought.
  18. The movie was good, and she said it was great.
  19. We got married, but things didn’t work out between us after all.
  20. I love him, but he doesn’t love me back.
  21. He was a good man; he knew how to help others, how to smile when things didn’t go his way and how to be a good father even though he wasn’t married.
  22. He was a good man; he knew how to help others, how to smile when things didn’t go his way and how to be a good father even though he wasn’t married .
  23. “I’m sorry, but I can’t come to work tomorrow,” he said. “I have to stay home with my sick mother.”
  24. He was late for work again because his car broke down; if he didn’t get another job soon, he would lose his apartment; and worst of all, he wouldn’t be able to pay his bills.
  25. “I can’t believe it,” he said, “but I’m going to be late for work.”
  26. “He was convicted of conspiracy to commit . . . .”
  27. “It’s not a matter of what is right or wrong, it’s a matter of what we do.”
  28. “There is nothing to fear but fear itself.”
  29. “It’s not that I don’t trust you, I just don’t trust myself.”
  30. “It was really hard for me to get through college because I had no money.”
  31. I’m thinking about taking a trip to Europe this summer. … I haven’t decided where I want to go yet.
  32. I have just finished reading a wonderful novel by Jane Austen … but I don’t remember the title or the author’s name!
  33. She said she was sorry for what happened, but she couldn’t explain why she did it.
  34. I had a dream the other night…
  35. I have three sisters… My family doesn’t even know about this…
  36. I was just wondering if anyone had ever seen anything like this before…
  37. “I don’t know,” he said, “but I want to.”
  38. “You’re the one who brought up this subject,” Mary said, “so you should be able to tell us something about it.”
  39. “You’ve been here before,” she said. “You know what you need to do.”
  40. “We don’t have time for this discussion,” he said. “Let’s just vote on it and get it over with.”
  41. “And then we . . . ” she began.
  42. Insert three periods at the end of the sentence.
  43. Then add a fourth period, but don’t hit enter.
  44. Add one or more words that explain the ellipsis, like “she said.”
  45. I went to the store and bought milk and eggs.
  46. I went to the store and bought milk, eggs, and cheese.
  47. I went to the store and bought milk and eggs… and lots of other things too!
  48. “I like your shirt,” she said, “but it’s too small.”
  49. She said, “I like your shirt, but it’s too small.”
  50. She said, “I like your shirt.” She paused. “But it’s too small.”
  51. “The girl was walking down the street when she saw him.”
  52. “I’ve never met anyone like her before.”
  53. “It’s been a long time since I’ve seen you.”
  54. “I don’t know what to say, but I’m glad you’re here.”
  55. “I’m so tired of this job. I just want to quit.”
  56. I don’t know if it will work because I’ve never tried it before.
  57. Do you think we could make some money by selling our old furniture?
  58. I’m not sure if that’s what we should do, but it’s worth thinking about.
  59. I’m not sure what to say about this subject, so I’ll just leave it hanging here . . . .
  60. “I’m sorry,” she said, “but I just don’t think we should see each other anymore.”
  61. “You know,” said the man, “I’ve always wanted to write a book.”
  62. “I don’t know, but I think it’s not a good idea.”
  63. “What do you mean? How can you be so sure?”
  64. “Well, first of all, that’s not my decision.”
  65. “I failed my math test, but I’m going to try harder next time.”
  66. “I have a lot of work to do, but I’m going to go out for a jog first.”
  67. “The students started their tests, but they didn’t finish them.”
  68. “The dog was hungry and wanted some food, but he was too lazy to get up and eat.”
  69. “I think I know what happened, but I’d rather not tell you.”

More to read:

AlliterationClimaxInterjection100 Examples of Simile
AllusionCacophonyImagerySatire
AllegoryComedyIronySoliloquy
AnalogyColloquialism

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